Festivalljus – LED, Lens, Heatsink Assembly

Assembly Spotlight With Chassi 3D 1
One of the hardest things with this project is to solve the problem with the heating. 9 pieces of 3W LED tends to get very hot, 27W that have to be transferred to the air.

LED 3DLED Inverted 3D
If I bend the pins on the led I can make the LED’s go through the PCB. An alternative is to use a lot of small via’s under the LED to transfer the heat to the underside. But I think a direct contact with the heatsink will be more effective.

Assembly PCB with LEDs 3D Without Lens
Assembly PCB with LEDs BottomAssembly PCB with LEDs 3DAssembly PCB with LEDs SideAssembly PCB with LEDs Top

Assembly PCB with LEDs 3D With Heatsink Fan
Assembly PCB with LEDs 3D With Heatsink LensesAssembly PCB with LEDs 3D With Heatsink Side
A CPU cooler should be sufficient enough to transfer the heat out to the air. I don’t know if the fan is necessary.

The whole assembly will look something like this:
Assembly Spotlight With Chassi 3D 2Assembly Spotlight With Chassi 3D 3Assembly Spotlight With Chassi 3D 4

Optics Specification

Alco Bong 9000

IMG_6771
This is an alcoholic bong, two ultrasonic elements forces the water into small particles that forms a mist. The elements is normally used for water in decorations or water humidifiers.

IMG_6772IMG_6774
I got this old Ikea bowl from a second hand store. It holds the electronics for driving the ultrasonic elements, as well as an MCU to drive some leds.

IMG_6773IMG_6775
There’s two systems that is powered from a single 6S LiPo battery.
The ultra sonic elements is apparently sensitive about over voltage and will fry if the voltage exceeds 24V. The first system consists of a buck that caps the fully charge voltage of 25.2V down to 24.0V. That system is activated by a momentary switch on the front.

The second system drives the RGB LED’s. A nice party bong should look good. A small Arduino Nano is driving some WS2812 RGB leds around the glass pitcher. A buck converter caps the voltage at 5V that is used by both the WS2812 RGB strip and the MCU.
The led lights is slowly breathing when the alco bong is idle, and rotates the color hue when in use.

IMG_6776IMG_6777
The glass pitcher was glued on the bottom with epoxy and seemed to bound well with the wooden bowl.

Orkide Random – A IoT flower with pretty random power

A video posted by Tim Gremalm (@timgremalm) on


Probably the most random plant in the world, it fetches a “true” random signal and display pretty colors on a WS2812 addressable LED strip.
The seed is based on one of the best randomization generators; cosmic background radiation from random.org. Yet another Internet of Things device made out of the ESP8266, the dirt cheap powerful WiFi enabled microcontroller.
IMG_6704
IMG_6705IMG_6706IMG_6707

IMG_6708IMG_6709IMG_6710IMG_6712IMG_6713IMG_6714IMG_6711

IoT Nalle dances to Twitter feed

IMG_6683
An Internet of Things enabled teddy bear that dances at filtered Twitter statuses.

IMG_6684
IMG_6685IMG_6688IMG_6686IMG_6687
To move the teddy bears arms servos is used. It’s a pretty simple setup, some extenders for the arms that is going through the real arms of the teddy bear.
The servos is quite weak, so they bearly move the arms at all.

IMG_6689
IMG_6690
Mounting of the servos.

IMG_6691
IMG_6692
The electronic setups contains of a small cheap microprocessor called ESP8266. The ESP8266 have a small WiFI-antenna integrated in the breakout board and can hook up to any access point, or even create one.
I’m running the firmware NodeMCU , it’s a real time LUA interpreter. So the firmware is only programmed once on the flash. To write your own program you just transfer them over serial UART, and the firmware will save the script on flash.
The processor is running at 80MHz so it’s pretty fast.

IMG_6693
I’m using Twitters API to fetch the latest post on a specific search term. The API gives me a detailed formated JSON file containing the time and date of the post, as well as the post.
The Twitter API is quite messy to work with, a lot of headers and authentication is required. The ESP would likly handle both the SSL and the big JSON format, but it will steal some CPU-time and it’s hard to work with. I made a PHP-proxy for the twitter feed, parsing the time and date and presenting it in unix timecode. The message of the post is stored as an MD5 hash sum.
On the IoT Nalle i keep track of the already “danced” Twitter posts and only dnaces to new posts.

IMG_6695
IMG_6694IMG_6696IMG_6697
Final assembly, a lot of hot glue and screws was used.

Interactive LED balancing board

A video posted by Tim Gremalm (@timgremalm) on


IMG_6636
IMG_6637
An interactive game were the visitors can build complex structure with help from an interactive LED balancer.
The installation was part at Vetenskapsfestivalen.

It’s a project by Stig Anton Nielsen read more about it in this post.

TeiSteadyBuilds from stig anton nielsen on Vimeo.

IMG_6645

A video posted by Tim Gremalm (@timgremalm) on

IMG_6638IMG_6643IMG_6644

The loadcells is build from 16 layers of conductive carbon packaging film. The recistance ranging from 500k to about 450 Ohm loaded at 8kg. Because it’s a so huge range the loadcells can be directly hooked up in a voltage divider, no amplifiers needed.
3 load cells us used to detect the direction and force of the balance. They are really sensitive to touch, small pressures from fingertips will be easily detected. A backside is that the film tends to be squashed so that it takes long time form the form and resistance to return.
The value from the 3 loadcells is arranged in 3 forces 120 degrees apart. The Forces is calculated into a resultant that is describing a thrust vector.
The thrust vector is indicated with a led strip of addressable WS2812 LED light. The stronger the force, more inbalanced, the greater the red marking will grow.

Att this Google Drive document I’ve collected som measuring data from the loadcells. There’s also some information of how the resultant is calculated.

LED lights in Iceland

LED pixel wall at Keflavik airport

IMG_6391
At the airport a stumbled on some cool LED fixtures, it was some kind of addressable LED with an extraordinary diffuser made out of textile.
You can see the beautiful animation of a volcanic eruption lava on the right screen, and a sweet animation of aurora on the left.

IMG_6397IMG_6394IMG_6395IMG_6399

Addressable LED facade at Harpa concert hall Reykjavík

IMG_6237
They had lit up the whole facade of Reykjavíks concert hall Harpa.
It had small narrow LED strips in each window pane that covered the building completely, it looked beautiful at night.
IMG_6240

Festivalljus – Lighting

IMG_3889
Regarding the lighting, the last few months I’ve been researching different kind of LEDs and optics.
Our goal is to get really narrow spotlight, maybe 6-10 degrees, and it’s really hard to get a narrow beam like that.

There exists a few models of 5/10mm hole mounted LEDs with build in focusing-optics right into the housing (http://www.ebay.com/itm/310181790384). Those LEDs makes a narrow ~13degree beam which is nice, but the RGB-colors are separated.
When you build an array of small LEDs like this it’s working quite well, but it’s not a perfect spotlight as it casts RGB-shadows (like this http://www.lungstruck.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/IMG_1965.jpg).
IMG_1965
Another bad thing with smaller LEDs are that it’s hard to get bright enough. If I were to but in 192 5mm LEDs it would only give me 15W of LED power.

Another LED-type that I’ve looked into is big 50W LED-arrays (http://www.ebay.com/itm/380676009599) with complementing 78mm lenses.
These types of LED-arrays give out it’s own LED-pattern when focused narrow enough. You can solve this by adding a diffuser close to the LED-array.
But you would have to add two 78mm lenses to focus down the beam. The narrow beam is the best so far, really crisp and around 6 degrees.
The bad thing is that it weights to much for my small construction, and also it brings upp the cost per unit really much.
Another bad thing is that you’ll need active cooling, which also adds to the weight. I used an ordinary CPU-cooler for desktop-computers.

The latest LED-type I’ve tried is 3W Star High Power RGB (http://www.ebay.com/itm/160582419768).
Ontop of that I’ve placed a special lens called a Collimating lens. Collimating lenses are directing beams from different angles straight into a column of light, it’s best described by this picture (http://www.laserfocusworld.com/content/dam/lfw/print-articles/2012/06/1206LFWnews05web.gif).
1206LFWnews05web

The lens I tried also have a built in reflector (http://www.ebay.com/itm/390625279166).
This is the best solution for my project so far. I weighs almost nothing, gives me 50W of power in an array of 16 LEDs.
A negative thing about the collimating lens is the beam is much more fuzzy than the two above LED-types. It gives out a narrow beam, but there is a lot of light leaking through around the beam.

IMG_3867
IMG_3868_annotation

DIY Moving Head Spotlight PAR RGB-LED

There’s a small festival up in Uddevalla (Sweden) called Elinorspelen. It’s a non-profit festival with the goal to have fun and spread culture. Unfortunately the festival have a very low budget and can’t afford all the equipment that it needs, and lighting has especially been down-prioritized.

Two friends of mine, and I, decided to do something about it. We got together and started discuss what kind of stage light that would be possible to buy/make.

We all agreed on that moving head spotlights would probably the cheapest alternative that gave the most visual effect.

Research

We started out to search for cheap LED-diodes to make our own spotlight.
But after a day or so we quickly found out that to just build the a LED-array would cost as much as a commercial spotlight. For example this LED PAR 56 black 151 LEDs RGB 16W for 296SEK.
We soon gave up the idea of making our own LED spotlights.

But we found out that all the cheap LED-spotlights had a very wide beam angle, and we wanted a very narrow beam.

Making an RGB spotlight on a tight budget

We got back to the idea of making an spotlight ourselves. Picking out narrow 10-13° viewing angle LED’s from Ledz.com.

As I started to pick parts to the project, the list grew longer and the price were raised by big numbers.

I managed to find really cheap geared stepper motors from eBay for a really cheap price; 28BYJ-48 DC 12V, plus controller, for around 26SEK a piece. After some research it looked like that model i widely used in different DIY- and Arduino-projects.

After a few weeks of picking components forward and back I’ve come closer to a final budget on 450SEK per spotlight, and that excluding some material prices like polycarbonate. I suspect that the final price per unit will end up on 500SEK. That’s at least 3 times cheaper than any commercial light.

You can find the budget for the spotlights here (Google Drive).

Electronics

I’ve just a basic idea of what components the electrical design needs. Some micro-controller based up on the STM32 series should work well.
Some mosfets to drive the LED’s.
The LED’s should be connected in series to 12V, and have the same pinout as the popular LED-strips that are so widely available now. This should make the testing very easy.

Designing the chassis and mechanics

The designing process were making its way alongside with the budget, a design-change could radically change the budget.

I had a pretty basic idea how I wanted the final product to look like.


A LED-array soldered on to a PCB, the PCB should be mounted directly on an axis that were attached in a U-shaped arm.
The PCB would make the LED-array really lightweight and it should not be a problem for the geared stepper motor to move it.

I also thought of having the cabling layed inside the axis, so why not make the axis into a tube instead of a solid rod?

Moving the U-arm

But how would the U-arm move? I knew that a central shaft would be the focus in this problem. It should be able to move a pretty heavy weight, PCB + Stepper motor + alot of polycarbonate.

I also think that the moving head spotlight should be able to be mounted in several ways; placed on a flat surface shouldn’t be a problem. But be able to hang upside in a ceiling, or hanging from the side of a wall, that’s tough.
The center-axis mus be able to take on forces from many directions.
One thing was for sure, we needed alot of bearings.

With the bearings a shape took form, centered around the axis.

4 bearings are used on the center axis. 2 axial bearings to make it spin easy upside down and standing. And 2 bearings up and down to make the center-axis stiff and prevent it from leaning.

And around the bearings, the framework took place.

Somewhere here the pieces started to place them selves in the big puzzle, it was much easier to design now.

Around the framework we needed a casing to hold out dirt and to keep it pretty.
It’s hard to make a nice chassis by yourself, so  I started to look around for a cheap case designed for another purpose.

I found this cheap water bawl for dogs for around 17SEK. It’s about 200mm in diameter and should house the mechanics and the framework nicely.

Designing in CAD

It’s one thing to have you design in your head and on paper, but it’s hard to grasp if it will fit or not. It’s here CAD-design comes into the picture.
I started to draw the different parts needed. As I draw the parts I could easily adjust lengths of parts to fit each other. Make puzzle-slots for the different pieces in the U-arm.

I try to make an easy design that could easily be milled out in our CNC-machine. The most parts are made so they could be cut out in X-Y-axis. I’m also trying to make as long and narrow pieces as possible, because long pieces are easier to fit narrowly on to a big polycarbonate-sheet.

The last part of the CAD-design was to put it all together, attach bearings to the shaft, build the U-arm.

The first design is now complete. We’ll have to make several adjustments to the design in iterative steps.

But for now, I’m thinking it’s starting to look good!